Total Packages of Work: Women Living in Atlantic Canada Compared to the Rest of Canada

  • Martha MacDonald Martha MacDonald, Saint Mary's University, has research interests in gender and restructuring, particularly in a rural context, social security policy, and the implications of paid and unpaid work for women's health.
  • Shelley Phipps Shelley Phipps, Dalhousie University, conducts research on the health and well-being of Canadian children, women's paid/unpaid work and health, international social policy, poverty and inequality, and decision-making within families.
  • Lynn Lethbridge Lynn Lethbridge, Dalhousie University, focuses her research on child health and well-being, poverty and inequality and such gender-related issues as quality of care indicators for women with breast cancer.

Abstract

Atlantic Canadian women report significantly longer total hours of work (paid plus unpaid) than their sisters living elsewhere in Canada. We examine a variety of potential explanations, including demographic, economic, social/cultural and policy factors, highlighting the need for additional research on this issue.
Published
2012-03-01
Section
Original Research