Rethinking Women’s Studies: Curriculum, Pedagogy, and the Introductory Course

  • Margaret Hobbs Department of Women's Studies, Trent University
  • Carla Rice Canada Research Chair in Care, Gender and Relationships at University of Guelph

Abstract

We comment on the current context framing women’s and gender studies in Canada,identify recent and important curricular trends,and discuss some guiding principles that we have used to revise our first-year course. We offer reflections that might assist instructors in the challenging task of mounting the entry level course.

Résumé

Nous émettons des commentaires concernant le contexte actuel d'encadrement des études sur les femmes et sur le genre au Canada. Nous identifions les tendances circulaires récentes et importantes, et discutons de quelques principes directeurs dont nous avons fait usage dans le cadre de la révision de notre cours de première année. Nous offrons des réflexions qui pourraient aider les instructeurs avec la tâche difficile de monter le cours de première année.

Author Biographies

Margaret Hobbs, Department of Women's Studies, Trent University
Margaret Hobbs is Associate Professor and former Chair of the Gender and Women’s Studies Department at Trent University. The recipient of two teaching awards, she has extensive experience with the introductory course in Gender and Women’s Studies. She is also a member of the graduate programme in Canadian Studies and Indigenous Studies and was a founding board member of the Trent Centre for Community-Based Education. Her research focuses mainly on Canadian women’s history and welfare state development in Canada.
Carla Rice, Canada Research Chair in Care, Gender and Relationships at University of Guelph
Carla Rice is Canada Research Chair in Care, Gender and Relationships at University of Guelph, a position she recently assumed after serving as Associate Professor in Gender and Women’s Studies at Trent University. A leader in the field of body image within Canada, she is a founding member and former director of innovative initiatives such as the National Eating Disorder Information Centre and the Body Image Project at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto. Her research explores cultural representations and life history narratives of body and identity.
Published
2012-05-17